Getting Architecture Done
Efficient Methods for Architecture

The Reason to Excel On Tools

Is to leave them aside. To be connected to them—as a sketcher to her pencil or a painter to her brush—so the tool fades to let the creative focus on the design, instead of getting lost on the tools. Knowing what you can do with each tool is essential to create. Otherwise, time disappears trying to master a tool rather than creating with it. Knowing when to go back to pencil and paper—and concentrate in ideas—is important too.

Export AutoCAD Selected Elements to A Separate File

Earlier this year I found a new AutoCAD command I had never used before, the wblock command. With it, you can export Selected Elements of an AutoCAD drawing to a single file, keeping the Selected Elements on the file or removing them at the moment of exporting--depending on the option you select.

Three Simple Steps

  • Select elements you want into a separate DWG file.
  • Run the wblock command.
  • Set the options on the menu as desired--exported file path, what to do with the selected elements after they have been exported.

The command has been really useful for me when exporting portions of a CAD drawing from AutoCAD to Rhino. Hope you find it useful.

Getting Architecture Done

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'A Great Architect Gets Great Buildings Built'

Seth Godin:

Architecture students bristle when Joshua Prince-Ramus tells them that they are entering a rhetorical profession.

A great architect isn't one who draws good plans. A great architect gets great buildings built.

Now, of course, the same thing is true for just about any professional. A doctor has to persuade the patient to live well and take the right actions. A scientist must not only get funded but she also has to persuade her public that her work is well structured and useful.

It's not enough that you're right. It matters if it gets built.

(via)